News

GMIT joint runners-up in national Eurachem final

Author: 

Press Office

Date Article Written: 

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

DCU is this year’s winner of the national Eurachem Analytical Measurement Competition (EAMC), with GMIT and Carlow IT joint runners-up.

Over 40 chemistry students from institutes of technology and universities across Ireland took part in the finals hosted by the GMIT School of Science on Friday 30 March.

The winning team from DCU were Nicola McConnell and Barry Reid who are lectured by Dr Pat O’Malley, School of Chemical Sciences, DCU.  The runners-up, GMIT team, were Audrey Cahill and Leanne Kelly who are lectured by Dr Jean Hughes, GMIT, and the Carlow IT team, Fiona Hanlon and Lyndsey Hughes, who are lectured by Dr Ray Benson, Carlow IT.

All teams had to carry out experiments in the laboratory using Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and to process data from these experiments.   

The judges this year were Dr Ray Leonard, Henkel Loctite, Dr Darragh Cunningham, Environmental Protection Agency, and Dr Tom Hannigan, State Forensic Science Laboratory. 

The winners, their Alma Mater and the runners-up, were awarded a specially commissioned art piece based on the Newgrange monument.

Eurachem is an association of Professional European Analysts with close links to bodies charged with promoting excellence and reliability in analytical measurement worldwide.  The competition is designed to raise awareness among science students of the importance of accuracy and reliability in analytical measurement, and to raise levels of skills in analytical chemistry techniques.  Competitors are chosen by their own institution for their practical laboratory skills.

GMIT President Michael Carmody says it is heartening to see the significantly increased interest in science both at second and third level and particularly in the physical sciences including analytical chemistry: “Analytical chemists tend to find work in areas which are of immediate concern to the public such as ensuring environmental monitoring is being correctly carried out, guaranteeing the safety of medicines, ensuring data relating to forensic analysis is reliable and so forth.”

“Analytical Science programmes provide graduates with excellent knowledge and skills which are critical to the continued development of key sectors of the Irish economy especially the pharmaceutical sector and which lead to exciting and worthwhile careers.”

“Participation in competitions such as Eurachem is an important part of the students’ programme and adds to their CV as it shows employers that they have commitment and an interest in their  programme and in the area of scientific analysis and measurement generally.” he added.

Twelve third-level institutions competed in this year’s final:

Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT), Dundalk Institute of Technology (DkIT), Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT), Athlone Institute of Technology (AIT), Letterkenny Institute of Technology (IT Letterkenny), Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT), Institute of Technology Tallaght (IT Tallaght), Institute of Technology Tralee (IT Tralee), Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT), Institute of Technology Sligo (IT Sligo), Institute of Technology Carlow (IT Carlow),  and Dublin City University (DCU).

The Eurachem competition has been kindly sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Mason Technology, Allergan Pharmaceuticals, The Institute of Chemistry of Ireland, PharmaChemical Ireland, Analytical Trust Fund of the Royal Society of Chemistry , Medtronic Galway, JVA Analytical, and Lennox

Runners-up Audrey Cahill and Leanne Kelly with their lecturer Dr Jean Hughes (centre).

Runners-up Audrey Cahill and Leanne Kelly with their lecturer Dr Jean Hughes (centre).

Runners-up Audrey Cahill and Leanne Kelly with their lecturer Dr Jean Hughes (centre).